Camden architects | Residential architect projects

At GOAStudio London residential architecture we have extensive experience with working with the Camden planning department and we are familiar with all the relevant planning policies that might apply for your home project. Please see below links to some of our Camden residential architect projects.

Your personal requirements, the setting of the property, and the immediate context of the property are some of the factors that will determine what home alterations the Camden planners will be prepared to allow. We will advise you about what is reasonable to expect to get approval for, what might be tricky but still possible to get approval for, and what most likely the planners will say no to.

According to the latest Camden Council residential design guidance these are some of the key considerations that will determine the outcome of your planning application. Below we have copied and highlighted extracts of the most relevant current policy and advice for your home project.

EXAMPLES OF SOME OF OUR CAMDEN RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECT PROJECTS – PLEASE CLICK THE LINKS BELOW FOR IDEAS AND INSPIRATION

Summary design and planning guide  | Camden residential architect advice

 

CAMDEN CONTEXT – YOUR HOME AND SURROUNDINGS

Camden is a diverse and dynamic Borough with rich built and natural environments. The Borough contains many neighbourhoods each with their own distinctive identity and characteristics. Its architectural heritage is vast and the Borough has many buildings and places of architectural or historic importance.

The Borough has a rich architectural heritage with many special places and buildings reflecting Camden’s history. There are 39 Conservation Areas, covering almost 50% of the land area, which recognise their architectural or historic interest and their character and appearance. Further guidance on the character of each Conservation Area is included in Conservation Area Statements, Appraisals.

HOME

These measures are to ensure your living conditions are improved by the proposed changes to your home. They should be closely adhered to for all residential extensions or alterations except in circumstances where the proposal would contravene any of the other key principles concerned with neighbours and the wider community.

Regardless of the type of alteration or extension you are planning there are some basic principles that you should consider:

  • Respect and be complementary to the original character of the existing building;
  • Design spaces to be functional and adaptable for a range of uses, such as social gatherings, rest and relaxation;
  • Ensure rooms achieve a good quality internal environment that benefit from adequate natural daylight, outlook and ventilation;
  • Ensure that the space is usable and accessible to people with varying abilities;
  • Consider sustainable measures within the design that maintain and improve your living conditions;
  • Ensure extensions and alterations are safe and secure.

SUSTAINABILITY

There are certain measures that you can introduce along with the proposed changes to your home to make it more resilient, increase its energy efficiency, reduce your bills and carbon footprint. You should consider these along with the other key principles.

Regardless of the type of alteration or extension you are planning, there are some basic standards you should consider:

  • The orientation of your home and where the most appropriate location for an alteration/extension would be;
  • The size and design of your proposal, a larger extension may not always be the best solution, so consider your internal and external space requirements and the climate impact, such as maintenance costs (heating), use of materials and their embodied carbon, and the resulting quality of the external/garden space;
  • The quality of materials contributes to the overall efficiency and long term cost savings, particularly important for insulation and new windows/doors;
  • The installation of insulation and inclusion of renewable energy measures such as photovoltaics, solar thermal, and heat pumps can improve the comfort of your home, reduce your carbon footprint and overall bill costs;
  • The incorporation of green infrastructure as insulating material but also to improve the biodiversity, overall visual appearance and your wellbeing.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

The changes you make to your home should always improve your living conditions. The following home improvements relate to the most common types of alterations and extensions and explain how the key principles apply within each. Make sure you consider all key principles when designing your scheme, as they are all material considerations in the officer’s assessment of a planning application.

All homes, gardens and their context are different. Therefore, whilst your proposal would be expected to comply with the guidance, officers will apply this flexibility and every planning application will be assessed on its own merits.

MATERIALS

Materials are integral to the architectural design, appearance and character of a building. The choice and use of materials and finishes therefore plays a crucial role in any alteration and extension given their impact on the appearance and character of a home (and Conservation Area if applicable).

In order to be acceptable by Officers, materials should be:

  • CONTEXTUAL – The texture, colour, pattern and finish of materials (detailing) should relate well to the existing character and appearance of both the existing home and the wider area, particularly in Conservation Areas and listed buildings.
  • RESILIENT/DURABLE – Choosing a material that stands the test of time is crucial as there are many benefits to this. It would be affordable long term, it saves embodied carbon, and it would become part of the character of the property given its lifespan. The durability of a material should be appropriate for the expected lifetime of the building/element.

GROUND EXTENSIONS

There are several different types of extensions at ground level that you could consider to extend your home, depending on your housing type: terraced, semi-detached, detached.

As part of your preparation to extend your property at ground level, a preliminary site assessment is recommended, to consider the following:

  • The existing rear elevation and any previous extensions to it;
  • The rear elevation’s visibility and prominence in relation to gardens, streetscene and wider area;
  • The pattern of development of neighbouring buildings to include historic extensions and new types of development;
  • Other rear extensions present at the neighbouring buildings which obtained permission through a planning application or permitted development.

REAR EXTENSIONS

Depending on where your home is located, there are times when the rear of a building may be architecturally distinguished, either forming a harmonious composition, or visually contributing to the townscape. Where architectural merit exists, the Council will seek to preserve it when it is considered appropriate. Some of the Borough’s important rear elevations are identified in Conservation Area Appraisals.

In some cases, a more innovative design approach could address specific site constraints and in others, a structure that matches the existing home may better respond to the existing context. It is recommended that pre-application advice is sought where it is unclear what design approach would suit the host building.

There are certain considerations that should be taken into account when designing a rear extension to ensure it is sensitively and appropriately designed for its context. Rear extensions should:

  • Be subordinate to the building being extended, in relation to its location, form, footprint, scale, proportions, dimensions and detailing;
  • Be built from materials that are sympathetic to the existing building wherever possible;
  • Respect and preserve the original design and proportions of the building, including its architectural period and style;
  • Respect and preserve existing architectural features, such as projecting bays, decorative balconies, cornices and chimney stacks;
  • Be carefully scaled in terms of its height, width and depth;
  • Allow for the retention of a reasonably sized garden;
  • Respect and duly consider the amenity of adjacent occupiers with regard to daylight, sunlight, outlook, light pollution/spillage, and privacy;
  • Ensure the extension complies with the 45 degree test and 25 degree test as set out in the Amenity CPG – or demonstrate BRE compliance via a daylight test;
  • Consider if the extension projection would not cause sense of enclosure to the adjacent occupiers;
  • Ensure the extension does not cause undue overlooking to neighbouring properties and cause a loss of privacy.
  • Consider opaque lightweight materials such as obscured glass on elevations abutting neighbouring properties, in order to minimise overlooking;
  • Not cause light pollution or excessive light spillage that would affect:
  • neighbouring occupiers, including to those above where a property is divided into flats;
  • Wildlife on neighbouring sites, particularly near sites identified for their nature conservation importance. Consider the use of solid lightweight materials such as timber, one-way glass or obscured glass, in order to minimise light pollution;
  • Respect and preserve the historic pattern and established townscape of the surrounding area, including the ratio of built to unbuilt space;
  • Retain the open character of existing natural landscaping and garden amenity, including that of neighbouring properties, proportionate to that of the surrounding area;
  • Have a height, depth and width that respects the existing common pattern and rhythm of rear extensions at neighbouring sites, where they exist.

SIDE EXTENSIONS

When designing a side extension be aware that given its likely visible location in relation to the streetscene, it could have a greater impact on the host building, group of buildings and wider area. Gaps between buildings could help to soften the urban grain and provide visual interest and it is important you consider existing trees and vegetation within the design of the proposed extension.

In some cases, a more innovative design approach could address specific site constraints and in others, a structure that matches the existing home may better respond to the existing context. It is recommended that pre-application advice is sought where it is unclear what design approach would suit the host building.

There are certain considerations that should be taken into account when designing a side extension to ensure it is sensitively and appropriately designed for its context. Side extensions should:

  • Be set back from the main front elevation;
  • Be secondary to the building being extended, in relation to its location, form, footprint, scale, proportions, dimensions and detailing;
  • Be built from materials that are sympathetic to the existing building wherever possible;
  • Respect the dimensions of the existing front porch, where applicable;
  • Respect and celebrate existing architectural features into new design, where they make a positive contribution to the character of the building or groups of buildings, such as projecting bays and porches.

ROOF EXTENSIONS

Extending the roof to make it a habitable space is one of the most common and affordable types of development. There are times when only a small alteration, such as the installation of a dormer window could make your loft space habitable by providing more space and headroom.

As part of your preparation to alter or extend the roof of your property, a preliminary site assessment is recommended, to consider the following:

  • The existing roof form and any previous extensions to it;
  • The roof visibility and prominence in relation to gardens, streetscene and wider area, considering land topography;
  • The pattern of development of neighbouring buildings to include historic extensions and new types of development;
  • Other roof extensions present at the neighbouring buildings which obtained permission though planning application or permitted development.

A successful roof extension would consider the overall roof form of the existing building, adjoining buildings and impact in key views (when relevant) and be proportionate to the roof slope being extended.

The previous guidance presented a hard line approach of restricting development at roof level on any unbroken roofline. Under this guidance, a more flexible approach is proposed, to give more weight to existing older extensions and to those allowed under permitted development, in the immediate context of the building being proposed for extension, within and outside Conservation Areas.

Not every unbroken roofline is of heritage value and therefore it is not worthy of preservation.

NEW ROOF LEVELS

Extending properties with a new storey at roof level is a well established method to increase the useable space of properties. This type of extension would retain more space at ground level available for greenery, garden storage and outdoor activities.

The most common type of extensions to the roof are mansards, traditionally associated with Georgian or Victorian buildings, as the existing roof structure with front parapets or valley roofs allow for a simple insertion of a new level in this traditional form.

In general, a traditional approach for mansard extensions would be preferred for traditional buildings. You are also encouraged to think about different approaches to additional roof levels. It is recommended that pre-application advice is sought where it is unclear what design approach would suit the host building.

GOAStudio London residential architecture and interior design is an award-winning practice, specialising in architectural services for residential projects across London.

As your local residential architect our team aims to provide a friendly and professional service for your home project.

Our approach is based on carefully considering the particular aspects of each scheme before coming up with a creative way for you to instil your unique stamp on what we do and how we do it. 

Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and Architects Registration Board (ARB).

Appoint us for Camden residential architect projects in the following areas:


N19
Dartmouth Park
NW1 
Camden Town, Primrose Hill, Regent’s Park, Somers Town
NW3
Belsize Park, Hampstead, Swiss Cottage
NW5
 Gospel Oak, Kentish Town
NW6
Kilburn, South Hampstead, West Hampstead
NW8
Lisson Grove, St John’s Wood
W1 
Fitzrovia, Soho
WC1
Bloomsbury, Kings Cross, St Pancras

 Camden residential architect projects

For more information about the Camden planning department, policies and requirements please click the link above to be re-directed to Camden council website.

Name and origin

Both the borough and Camden Town are named after Charles Pratt, 1st Earl of Camden, who owned land here in the late 18th century. Camden Place was his seat in Kent, itself named after William Camden who lived in the property from 1609. [Londonist.com]

Camden planning department

You will probably need planning permission if you want to build something new, make a major change to your home – e.g. building an extension, or change the use of your property. There are different rules depending on what you want to do and the relevant planning policy that applies to your property. At GOAStudio we have a proud record of dealing with the local authority planners and building control inspectors and we are on hand to assist with your application and successfully handle every stage of your project.

Directory of Camden Architects

GOAStudio London residential architecture media opinion publications 2 Camden residential architect projects

iBuild magazine – Impressive renovation case study – South Hampstead residential house extension – February 2024

"GOAStudio's renovation and extension project in South Hampstead stands as a testament to the delicate art of preserving history while embracing the demands of contemporary living." This month our South Hampstead residential house extension and refurbishment project...

The Telegraph | How to get a bigger home in an unforgiving market

"As the inflation rate has started to fall and mortgage rates have drifted down, George Omalianakis, of GOAStudio London architects, says the appetite for renovations has started to creep up. “Homeowners are deciding that the future looks a bit better now and it is...

Ideal Home | Kitchen extension cost – what to budget for a new and large room

You want to land on an extension size that is just large enough to meet your internal needs. Going beyond this would be a waste of money. 'You will discover the right size by playing around with a few plans and layouts to see how best you can organise the internal...

Country Living – 9no. kitchen flooring ideas for a refreshed look. Tips and ideas by George Omalianakis, GOAStudio

9 kitchen flooring ideas for a refreshed look - Plus advice on practical choices for busy spaces, upcycling your existing tiles and how to pick underfloor heating. Article by Jayne Dowle, Country Living "The biggest trend of all in kitchen flooring in 2023 will be...

Homebuilding & Renovating | How much value does a loft conversion add

How much value does a loft conversion add? "The typical value added can be around 10% to 20% if creating a new bedroom and ensuite with a loft conversion, explains architect George Omalianakis from GOAStudio architects. He adds that the value increase will depend on...

Build It magazine | Lighting for kitchen diner extensions

"In general, there are two main impressions you can create with natural light. The theatre stage effect plays with the contrast between the lighter and darker areas, meaning less is more when it comes to rooflights. By reducing the amount of overhead light coming in,...

Architectural plans

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Terraced house extension plans

Terraced house extension plans and professional guidance for your home project   Do you own a Georgian, Edwardian or Victorian house? Is it terraced, semi-detached or detached? And would you like to add a single or double storey extension? In all these cases you...

Architects London – GOAStudio London residential architecture

Architects London GOAStudio London residential architecture We are London architects with a very specific focus, skillset and expertise and we work on residential projects across London. George Omalianakis is an expert London architect for residential extensions and...

Loft conversion cost planning permission architect guide

LOFT CONVERSION COST, ADDED VALUE, AND PLANNING PERMISSIONS By GOAStudio London residential architecture What loft conversion rooms add value?How much does a loft conversion cost?Do loft conversions add value? What is a hip-to-gable loft conversion?What is a mansard...

Rear house extension ideas photo gallery

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Householder planning permission. Haringey Noel Park Conservation Area.

Addition of a single storey rear extension and internal alterations to a single family dwelling in N22, Haringey.Area and context The site is a two-storey terrace dwellinghouse on the south side of Maurice Avenue. The property is located within the Noel Park...

Bromley BR3 house extension planning approval

Single storey rear extension and alterations to a house at Bromley BR3 - Approval by GOAStudio London residential architecture We have just obtained a planning approval for one of our current projects in Bromley BR3. For our latest Bromley BR3 house extension planning...

New planning approval Rear garden flat extension Westminster NW6

Planning approval for the addition of a single storey rear extension to a garden flat in Westminster, NW6. To include the replacement of windows to the front elevation. The new planning approval for a rear garden flat extension Westminster NW6 was issued by the...

New planning approval Conservation Area Waltham Forest E17

Planning approval Conservation Area Waltham Forest E17. To include the replacement of three timber windows to front and one timber window to rear with heritage uPVC double glazed windows - Orford Road Conservation Area, Waltham Forest in September 2022. The new...

New planning approval Rear house extension Enfield N21

Rear house extension Enfield N21 - We were appointed to design the renovations and extensions for a single family dwelling in a conservation area at Enfield N21. We have just obtained planning approval for a single storey rear ground floor extension to create a...

New planning approval rear house extension Barnet EN4

Rear house extension Barnet EN4 - We were appointed to design the renovations and the addition of a rear extension for a single family dwelling at Barnet EN4. We have just obtained planning approval for a single storey rear ground floor extension to create a combined...

New planning approval | House extensions Ealing W3

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New planning approval | Double rear extension Tower Hamlets E1

Double rear extension Tower Hamlets E1 - We proposed and obtained approval for the addition of a double storey rear extension to a ground floor maisonette flat; the planning approval included the creation of an external terraced area and associated internal and...

New planning approval | Rear house extension Enfield EN2

Rear house extension Enfield EN2 - We proposed the addition of a 4m. deep rear extension to create an enlarged kitchen and dining area that opens up to the rear garden. We made sure that the proposal could be considered as Permitted Development and we applied to...

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Let's chat

If you need expert advice from an RIBA Chartered Architect please email us at george@goastudio.co.uk with the following:

  • the full address of your property,
  • a couple of photographs showing the areas you would like to extend and renovate,
  • a brief description of the changes you would like to carry out to your home, and
  • any estate agent or similar plans you might have available.

We will

  • assess the information and get back to you with initial advice about what might be feasible,
  • search the public planning records of your local authority to find similar planning approvals nearby,
  • prepare a free consultation to include information on design ideas, architectural fee estimates, project stages and requirements, and
  • afterwards we will prepare a detailed fixed fee proposal to cover the architectural services you will need for your project.

We are here to assist with your project.

We provide architectural services in the following London Boroughs:

Read our design, planning, and architectural guides above if you seek advice for your project.

We can help you with these home extensions and renovations:

See our guides above for ideas, inspiration and architectural advice for your home project.

GOAStudio London residential architecture limited 2024 300x300 Camden residential architect projects

We specialise in

  • Greener homes
  • Retrofit and energy efficiency for older and traditional buildings
  • Conservation areas
  • Listed Buildings
  • Homeowner architectural services
  • Developer architectural services

RIBA Chartered architect services

CONTACT US

GOAStudio London residential architecture limited, 86-90 Paul Street, EC2A 4NE, Hackney

GOAStudio London residential architecture limited, Chestnut Avenue South, E17 9EJ, Waltham Forest

t: 0203 984 3005
e: george@goastudio.co.uk
e: media@goastudio.co.uk

 

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